Caring For Aging Parents

Caring For Aging Parents

There are various challenges that adult children experience while taking care of their aging parents. One of these caregiving challenges is the lack of idea of what it will take to give them the freedom of living independently around the house. Caring for these parents requires a significant investment of time and resources on the part of family caregivers, in addition to the possibility of needing a wheelchair.

An Analysis Of The Daily Needs For Caring For The Elderly Parents

Below, you’ll find a collection of Daily Living Needs Assessment questions that you may use as a guide. Answers to these questions should help people develop the best solutions, make better choices, and implement effective methods to guarantee that elderly parents living alone are secure and comfortable.

Is It Possible For Them To Live Independently And Safely?

  • Do they have vision, hearing, or memory issues? What about driving or walking?
  • How safe and easy is it for them to move about at home, considering all possible hazards?
  • Is it necessary to have home medical mobility assistance?
  • Could a power wheelchair be a more realistic option? Is it necessary if a cane, walker, manual wheelchair, or power scooter fails to fulfill their mobility requirements at home?

Which Mradls (Mobility-Related Daily Living Activities) Need The Provision Of Appropriate Assistance?

  • Bathroom, dressing, toileting, transferring, bowel/bladder control, and eating/feeding which are examples of Activities of Daily Living (ADL).
  • Meal preparation, cleaning, and laundry activities which are examples of instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs). The ability of a person to do these tasks independently is considered while establishing the necessary level of care and assistance.
  • Taking the car or public transportation to and from appointments.

Is There Anything That Needs Changing In Terms Of The Environment Or Accessibility To Make It Safer?

  • Does the house have anything significant that needs fixing or upgrading (roof, plumbing, wiring, appliances)?
  • Is the home accessible to those who use motor wheelchairs, and does it have modifications to ensure their safety? Better lighting, non-slip surfaces, grab bars, lowered switches and knobs, bigger doors, and wheelchair ramps are some examples of accessibility improvements.
  • Is it safe for older folks to live freely in the neighborhood surrounding their own homes?
  • Is there a system of security, fire/smoke, and personal medical emergency alarms in place?

A caregiver’s work entails constant learning and adaptability. Understanding and preparing for your parents’ evolving needs is an essential part of the process. As such, it is important for you to have a proper glimpse of the appropriate type of scooter for a certain individual. Additionally, the prices of the mobility aids differ depending on the intended purpose. Broad research is important for you to understand your surrounding environment to determine the most suitable type of mobility aid.

This information is only for educational reasons, and you should not take it as a substitute for professional medical advice. All content is general and may not apply to everyone or every situation unless otherwise indicated.